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Monday, June 2, 2014

Diane Keaton: Actress and home decor enthusiast

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Diane Keaton’s love of art and design began at an early age while crafting and scrapbooking alongside her mother. Today, with an accomplished acting and filmmaking career, she’s also turned her attention to sharing candid and intimate moments about beauty, aging and the importance of staying true to yourself with her new book, Let’s Just Say It Wasn’t Pretty. See how Diane continues to shares her vision, style, and flair—as well as design her new dream home—all thanks to Pinterest!

Hi Diane. How did you find your passion in the arts?

My mother was a crafts nut. You have to try to imagine the 50’s, and with it, Sunset Magazine, a kind of early “Martha Stewart Living” publication with breezy suggestions on how to create the perfect California/Cliff May lifestyle. Mom made mosaic tile tables. She sewed the living room curtains out of yardage she found at the Goodwill Thrift Store. She created separate scrap books for all four of her kids on a yearly basis, as well as a variety of shell boards she hammered into the walls. Then came the collage. When Mom began collage-ing trash cans, pencil boxes and book covers, we all joined in. I was 15 when I collaged my entire bedroom wall in black and white photographs I’d cut out from Vogue Magazine. Later I became an early tear sheet fanatic. This is why Pinterest has been such a home run for me. Pinterest provides more photographic “fixes” (I am an addict) than anywhere else on earth!

If you asked me where I’d like to take my next vacation. It’s easy. Book me two weeks in a dark room with my computer, next to my Ipad, with my Iphone resting on top.

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You’ve probably come across a variety of words on a page and new ideas in conversation. What gets you excited when you read a script or hear about an original concept for the first time?

Like most women, I’m moved by human interest stories. Stories with strong psychological conflict and stunning image driven content. I love romantic comedies with a great look. Let’s take Nancy Meyers’ film, “Something’s Gotta Give.” It’s been ten years since it was released, and women still come up to me Ooohing and Aaahing over the kitchen in “that movie you made with Jack Nicholson”. They don’t always remember the name of the film but they ALWAYS remember the kitchen.

We caught your After a Fashion, Factory Floor, and Home Library boards. Can you give us an insider look about your inspiration behind these boards?

Most of my boards were chosen because of my current obsession with building a new house. The dream house. My first board was “Curb Appeal”, the next was “Last House On The Left”. Both quickly became occupied with captivating exteriors. At least for me. From there I went on to cover interiors with titles like "Sleep Tight", “Tack Room Tactics”, and “Breakfast of Champions.” At “bloglovin.com" I found an industrial kitchen with great lighting. On "Desire to Inspire’s" Country Farmhouse I saw a Kitchen bigger than most living rooms. Wanting more detail, I pinned things from "Emmas.blogg.se" where I couldn’t help choose the hanging wood Chopping Blocks on a perfect white brick wall. It’s an endlessly engaging endeavor.

Follow Diane Keaton’s board Last House On The Left on Pinterest.

What do you want people to experience when they stumble upon your board that has a variety of eclectic and stylized pins, like Picture Universe? Why the Black and White motif?

I’m not thinking about what people experience when they see my boards. I’m not thinking about what they want. I’m thinking about what I want. Everyday millions of people share their insights, their vision, their flair, and their longings on Pinterest. Just this morning I found myself on Louise Bilodeau’s profile. Inside her “restaurant/bar" board I pinned "Pizza With No name in Revkjavik, Iceland” to my “Breakfast Of Champions" board. Who is Louise Bilodeau? Where does she live? Is she French? I’ll never know, but one thing I do know…Louise has given me a Pizza place I love, and that’s enough for me.

You ask why black and white? Because color can be too demanding. Let’s just say, a little goes a long way, especially in a house. Take the great Latin American Architect Ricardo Legorreta, who used bright yellows and reds and blues to frame his spaces. From my vantage point color should never overwhelm or distract from the primary color in a home, and that is the color of the people inside. People get lost when framed by too much vibrant color. Do you like how you look set against a bright pink and purple wall? Just asking.

Follow Diane Keaton’s board Breakfast Of Champions on Pinterest.

Have you used Pinterest to prep for any roles in front or behind the camera?

I have not had the opportunity but I know several director friends who’ve used it as an inspirational story board. It’s a perfect tool on many fronts.

When and if I take on another directing job there’s no question I will be using Pinterest. Why wouldn’t I? As I mentioned, one of Pinterest’s recent gifts has been to help me map out examples of what I want my dream house to look like. It’s reassuring to come across so many other people charting out their dreams with Pins as well. The beauty part is we’re sharing those fantasies. I see Pinterest as a kind of “family of man” event, a kind of “pay it forward” thing. In a way we’re presenting our version of previous generations scrapbooks, slideshows, and home movies, right? Now it’s Facebook, and Twitter, only this time everything is illustrated with images we would have missed were not for Pinterest with it’s millions upon millions, upon billions of photographs that infuse our dreams.

What’s next on your to-do list as a storyteller?

Lets Just Say It Wasn’t Pretty" is the title of my new board. It’s also the title of my new book, a collection of impressions on beauty. First of all, what is beauty? What do we want from beauty? Is it only skin deep? How do we form our perceptions of it’s complex hold over our thoughts and feelings? There are no illustrations in "Lets Just Say It Wasn’t Pretty," yet it is filled with anecdotes, mentions, and accolades on a host of amazing people. There are no photographs of their magnificent faces, including such diverse people as Jack Nicholson, Ellen DeGeneres, and Abraham Lincoln. I’m talking about people I’ve loved, people I’ve envied, but most of all, people who’ve come to beauty by way of the back door; people who see it differently; people who’ve made their wrongs a certain kind of right.

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A few weeks ago I began pinning their portraits on a “Lets Just Say It Wasn’t Pretty” Board. There you can see Jackie Kennedy next to Katy Perry; Meg Ryan with her hand under her chin next to Judy Garland with her hand under her chin. Justin Beiber above Elvis Presley. Hillary Clinton next to Kate Moss. Gary Grant with Katherine Hepburn. John Wayne below Rihanna. You get the drift. All of them are my heroes and heroines.

For an artist looking to follow in your footsteps, what’s one piece of advice you’d give him/her?

Advice is easy to dish out but hard to take. One thing for sure…following in my footsteps is a bad idea. Why would anyone want to follow in anyone else’s footsteps when they have their own? Maybe that’s my advice, my only advice. Follow your footsteps, your impulses, your wishes, your Pinterest, your wrongs that make you right. Give it a try. And think about this…most people listen to what they want to hear, when they ready to hear it. I know that’s how it worked for me.

Thanks Diane for giving us a personal insight into your dream home, style, and creative vision. For more, make sure you get your hands on Diane’s new book, and if you want to see what she’s is pinning next, check out her Pinterest boards!